¿Quién se robó los colores? 3rd Edition

Spanish Reader with Activities | Novice-High to Intermediate-Low

Authors

  • Alister Ramírez Márquez, Ph. D
  • Alicia Bralove Ramírez, Ph.D.

¿Quién se robó los colores? 3rd Edition

Spanish Reader with Activities | Novice-High to Intermediate-Low

Authors

  • Alister Ramírez Márquez, Ph. D
  • Alicia Bralove Ramírez, Ph.D.

Features

  • Has been featured by America Reads Spanish
  • Appropriate for both heritage speakers and students learning Spanish as a second language 
  • Covers present, preterit, imperfect, future, present perfect, and past perfect tenses 
  • Reflexive verbs introduced in chapter 5
  • 125 pages/10 chapters with pre-reading, reading, and post-reading activities

Description

The intermediate level Spanish reader, ¿Quién se robó los colores?, takes readers on a journey through pre-Columbian myths with a completely modern setting : an entire series of worlds that exist on a computer screen. The text is ideal for heritage speakers or learners who studied Spanish previously and wish to review.

The storyline is based on a pre-Columbian myth about the origins of the first man on Earth. In the story, the world’s colors are controlled by the computer of an evil and greedy villain, Taya. Are, a butterfly-girl, travels through different worlds trying to right the wrongs of Taya. Colors, body parts, the senses, and some names of animals and plants are all covered with an emphasis on vocabulary in context, expressions, grammar and exercises.

Each of the reader’s ten chapters contain pre-reading, reading, and post-reading activities designed to develop all language skills: reading, listening, speaking and writing. At the end of each chapter, students will have the chance to create their own story. The questions will encourage them to use the language in context, utilizing the vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and structures learned to communicate their own world.

As students practice grammar and vocabulary, they will also become more aware of aspects of pre-Columbian cultures, including allusions to indigenous traditions that are still practiced in communities throughout the Hispanic-American world today.